security and privacy

Authorization

Authorization

Authorization is the function of specifying access rights/privileges to resources, which is related to general information security and computer security, and to access control in particular. More formally, “to authorize” is to define an access policy. For example, human resources staff are normally authorized to access employee records and this policy is often formalized as access control rules in a computer system. During operation, the system uses the access control rules to decide whether access requests from (authenticated) consumers shall be approved (granted) or disapproved (rejected). Resources include individual files or an item’s data, computer programs, computer devices and functionality provided by computer applications. Examples of consumers are computer users, computer software and other hardware on the computer.

The most common authorization protocol is OAuth. The OAuth 2.0 authorization framework is a protocol that allows a user to grant a third-party web site or application access to the user’s protected resources, without necessarily revealing their long-term credentials or even their identity.

OAuth introduces an authorization layer and separates the role of the client from that of the resource owner. In OAuth, the client requests access to resources controlled by the resource owner and hosted by the resource server and is issued a different set of credentials than those of the resource owner. Instead of using the resource owner’s credentials to access protected resources, the client obtains an access token–a string denoting a specific scope, lifetime, and other access attributes. Access tokens are issued to third-party clients by an authorization server with the approval of the resource owner. Then the client uses the access token to access the protected resources hosted by the resource server. Auth0 generates access tokens for API authorization scenarios, in JSON web token (JWT) format. The permissions represented by the access token, in OAuth terms, are known as scopes. When an application authenticates with Auth0, it specifies the scopes it wants. If those scopes are authorized by the user, then the access token will represent these authorized scopes.

Sources:

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Authorization

https://auth0.com/docs/authenticate/protocols/oauth

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